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Huichol Art and Culture: Balancing the World

Click on any thumbnail to start slideshow
with enlarged images and captions.

Unknown Artist, Men’s Capes, 1934. Manta Cloth; 97 x 95 cm; 97 x 93 cm/ Robert M. Zingg collection, Museum of Indian Arts and Culture/ Laboratory of Anthropology.  Unknown Artist, Textile Ribbons, 1934. Lengths range from 0.75 to 1.1 m/ Robert M. Zingg collection, Museum of Indian Arts and Culture/ Laboratory of Anthropology. Unknown Artist, Textile Ribbons, 1934. Lengths range from 0.75 to 1.1 m/ Robert M. Zingg collection, Museum of Indian Arts and Culture/ Laboratory of Anthropology.
Unknown Artist, Textile Ribbons, 1934. Lengths range from 0.75 to 1.1 m/ Robert M. Zingg collection, Museum of Indian Arts and Culture/ Laboratory of Anthropology. Unknown Artist, Backstrap loom, 1934. 107.6 x 46.3 cm/ Robert M. Zingg collection, Museum of Indian Arts and Culture/ Laboratory of Anthropology. Unknown Artist, Shamans’ basket, 1934. Contain feathers, prayer arrows, and shamans’ wands./ Robert M. Zingg collection, Museum of Indian Arts and Culture/Laboratory of Anthropology
Unknown Artist, Huichol votive gourd bowl, 1934. Diameters from 10.8 to 21.6 cm/ Robert M. Zingg collection, Museum of Indian Arts and Culture/ Laboratory of Anthropology. Unknown Artist, Sacred yarn boards, 1934. 11.3 x 6.3 x 1.1 cm; 9.7 x 7.0 x 1.0 cm/ Robert M. Zingg collection, Museum of Indian Arts and Culture/ Laboratory of Anthropology. Unknown Artist, Glass bead earrings, 1934. Lengths range from 6.5 to 7.9 cm/ Robert M. Zingg collection, Museum of Indian Arts and Culture/ Laboratory of Anthropology.
 Unknown Artist, God disc, 1934. 30.6 diameter x 5.8 cm/ Robert M. Zingg collection, Museum of Indian Arts and Culture/ Laboratory of Anthropology. Unknown Artist, Quivers of deerskin, 1934. Lengths range from 60.1 to 73.5 cm/ Robert M. Zingg collection, Museum of Indian Arts and Culture/ Laboratory of Anthropology Unknown Artist, Votive gourd bowl, 1934. 20.0 x 7.0 cm/ Robert M. Zingg collection, Museum of Indian Arts and Culture/ Laboratory of Anthropology.

Museum of Indian Arts and Culture/Laboratory of Anthropology
April 11, 2010 - March 6, 2011

The Huichol people are a Native American tribe located in Western Mexico. This exhibition shows the relationship between the Huichol people and other groups, both European and Native American. The Huichol people still hold many native traditions and customs that they can express in their artwork. Click on the images above to learn more!



Some of these pieces of artwork also served important purposes. Can you guess what they were used for? The Huichol people believed that artwork could help communicate with the gods. Can you think of any objects today that people use to try to communicate with religious gods or figures?




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